I Smile

Something I haven’t talked about is what’s life like these days.  I’m not talking about the medical stuff here, but life!  Day-to-day life which is what the blog is all about.  I’ve been so concentrated on the pain issue that I haven’t talked about anything else.

I dare anyone to blame me for this.

Here is a weird thing.  I decided to buy a 2017 Fiat 500.  Why?  I seldom drive anywhere.  I’m heavily medicated most of the time.  I can’t see worth anything especially at night.  I don’t have deep pockets of money to spend anywhere.  You can’t haul medical equipment in the car.  The trunk is too small.  You can’t even haul passengers in the car unless they are munchkins with teeny tiny legs.  I can’t lift my right leg to get into the car.  Surprisingly, the front seat of the Fiat is higher than your average car.  So what I have do is this.  I found a leg raiser thing-a-ma-jig at a medical supply store.  It looks like a loop on a long wired handle.  You place your foot in it and pull on it with your arms.  It raises your foot up, almost high enough to the level of the Fiat.  It works well enough.

My life is spent running from one Doctor’s office to another.  It’s the highlight of my life.  I get to get dressed in something better than I normally do.  I put on a wig since my hair is shot, and some makeup.  I look okay for the day.  Lastly, I put on my smile that everyone seems to love.  As long as I’m smiling, the world thinks everything is okay with me.

I have cleaners come in every two weeks.  Will hope to move them up to every week when things get better financially.  I’m in the market for a new wheelchair that medicare approves of.    I spend a lot of time researching this.  Have you seen what’s out there?  Unbelievable!!!  One costs as high as $14,000.  Which is, of course, the one I fell in love with.  Anyone care to make a donation?

My Take On This

 All is well with the world around me as long as when they see me, I am smiling.  There is no such thing as showing a face of pain.  If you do, they compare their pain to yours!  At first, early in the disease, I tried to educate people.  I no longer have the desire to do so on a daily basis.  Hence, the reason for the book.

I’ve reached a point in my Multiple Sclerosis where things are sliding downwards and fast.  I fought wheelchairs, but now I spend my nights prowling through websites and watching videos on all that is out there, dying to get my hands on one that works.  

I watch my life changing almost daily and dramatically.  There’s nothing I can do about it.  There is only one thing to do.

I smile.  It makes the people around me feel better and believe it or not, it eventually makes me feel better.

 

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A Reminder to Self

ratty-old-booksSometimes you meet someone and for some inexplicable reason, you click with that person.  Has that ever happened to you?  It doesn’t matter whether they have Multiple Sclerosis or not.  In the world of mutual admiration, illness takes a back seat.

At the same time, sometimes you meet someone and for some reason they rub you the wrong way.  Getting to know them better, you realize that what you first felt is still how you feel weeks or months later.  Has that ever happened to you?

Then there are strangers whom you haven’t met.  You know what I mean?  For instance, people walking towards you on the sidewalk.  You smile at them and they don’t smile back?  You’ve seen them.  I’m sure you have.  Or are you the type of person that doesn’t smile at strangers?  I smile at them all the time, when I’m out that is, which isn’t very often.  These people look at you and they will react one way or another.

It is evident that something is wrong with you.  Either you are walking with a cane, leaning on someone’s arm, in a wheelchair, or walking like you’re drunk and hanging on the wall of a building.  I know you understand all these scenarios.

I smile.  It’s simply my nature to smile when I catch someone’s eyes.  That’s a weird expression, isn’t it?  (Catch someone’s eyes.)

So okay, I smile at people and some will smile back and others won’t.  Some people will even respond to your smile by uttering a greeting of one kind or another such as, “Good morning.”  Other’s make a point of trying not to look at you.  You can see them glance your way, and then they quickly avert their eyes to something else.  Still there are others who don’t look up at all.  They resolutely stare down at their feet as they walk.

Sometimes the people that you meet have a predetermined impression about you based on your outward appearance.  Aren’t we all guilty of that?  The color of your skin, how fat or skinny you are, tall or short, the way you walk and talk, their perceived intellect of you, pretty or ugly, and the list goes on.  All of these values that people judge each other are subjective, meaning that it is an individual’s perception of these values.

So what am I going on and on about?  I’m not sure!!!  Let me try and remember.  You know what this is like.  Sheesh!

Okay, I’m back.  Have to type fast before it runs away from me again to hide in the dark recesses of my mind, as though playing hide-and-seek with me.

I’m addressing how we react to people when we first see each other and the powerful impressions that are imprinted in heads.  Because of those impressions, we make a value judgement.  Right?

This is highly unlikely with people with MS (Multiple Sclerosis) since many of us are  in wheelchairs, but it’s for the others who read this blog as well.  Then again, some of us with MS also think this way.  Think about it.  We see someone in a wheelchair coming towards us.  Do we say hello or not?  What if the person in the wheelchair is hanging over the side (exaggeration here) and drooling?  Were we going to say hi but changed our minds?  Why did we change our mind? We probably made a judgement decision.  We may not be aware that we did, but we probably did.

We complain about people judging us but I bet if you analyze yourself, you too are judging others.  Practice what you preach?  Yes, I think so.  I know that I am guilty of it but if I become aware that I’m doing it, I make an immediate attitude adjustment or at least try to.

I don’t want people judging me because the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis can be very obvious, as in my case.  What right do I have to judge others whether I’m in a wheelchair or not?

Being ill does not give us justification to throw away decent human principles.  Having Multiple Sclerosis or any other disease does not give us the right to expect more from society at large than when we ordinarily would expect to receive.  Now I’m talking respect and moral issues.  What’s that old saying by ???  I know it’s in the Bible but it’s in other places as well, even older than the Bible.

“The Golden Rule or law of reciprocity is the principle of treating others as one would wish to be treated oneself. It is a maxim of altruism seen in many human religions and human cultures.[1][2] The maxim may appear as either a positive or negative injunction governing conduct: ” (I looked this up in Wiki.)

So let’s not kid ourselves.  If you want to be treated with kindness, then be kind.  If you want that smile when you walk down the street, smile at them.  If you don’t want others to treat you with disdain, don’t do it to others.

If you expect more than what you give, it ain’t gonna happen.  I’ve found the opposite to be true.  If you give more than what you receive,  oftentimes you are met with disappointment.  That’s no reason to clump people into a Rolodex file under “people I don’t like”.

A good thing we can do for ourselves in every day living is to treat others how we would like to be treated.  It’s difficult but it’s a positive thing to do and it’s medicinal.  Don’t fill your heart with bitterness towards others who treat us unkind.  Instead treat others who are unkind as if they have a disease and they need help!  Then give them the attention that you would like to receive as an ill person.  Remember that what you give is what you’ll get, if not in this world in some other world.

MY TAKE ON THIS:
I don’t know what got into me to write the above.  I think it’s because we went out the other day and I encountered two different types of people.  One didn’t meet my eyes, another did and smiled.  There was another person, now that I think about it, who just stared down at the ground.  I felt sorry for them.
My first impulse was to feel indignant at the person who saw me but didn’t smile and the other person who saw me then glanced away.  Then I got to thinking about why I felt this way.  I suppose I’m telling you what I told myself when I hollered at myself inside my head.  I do that a lot.  Holler at me inside my head.
So take this particular blog for what it is.  A reminder to self to be nicer to people and not to expect special treatment just because I’m ill–and not to judge people by their cover because I don’t want them judging me either.